I just wanna preface this blog post before you start reading by saying this is a little bit of a heavier post. However, I do believe that by talking about several of my childhood experiences, I can help you be more mindful about seeing the people + places that matter the most. While you still can.

How my childhood experiences influence the way I photograph families

1. I LOST MY DAD

Both my sister and I were quite young when our dad Robert passed away (3 & 4). We were too young to have memories of him, or to even remember him. All we had left behind were photos and stories we were told about him. Not only did we not have any memory of him but I was given two photos of him and I together, my younger sister didn’t even get that. 

Photos serve as evidence of how tenderly we are cared for and love those around us. None of us know what the future holds.

There are so many of us who have already experienced loss and the regret of not taking the time to document those who mean the most. Photography that documents our everyday life gives those who have experienced a catastrophe or who worry about the possibility of one, the opportunity to be able to remember the little stories and special details of a loved one.

 

 

How my childhood experiences influence the way I photograph families

(Above is a photo of my childhood best friend Shelly and I wrestling in our “new” house. We’d just made the biggest moved we’d ever had from Thomson, Georgia to Celeron, New York. My sister Melissa took the photo using a disposable camera Shelly had brought with her to document her trip.)

2. WE MOVED A LOT

My mom worked so hard as a single mother, but unfortunately, even that wasn’t always enough for us to get by. So that meant we were often saying goodbye to the people and places we loved. Somewhere inside of me, it created a richer appreciation for those around me, especially those who mattered.

Always being the “new girl” also meant I loved meeting new people and getting to know their inner layers.

 

How my childhood experiences influence the way I photograph families

(In this photo, Melissa and I are helping my mom plant flowers. My mother has always been passionate about her flowers! If you look closer though, Melissa is looking at a car. It’s likely broken down, which meant we’d get to meet someone new, let them use our phone and sit and chat with them while they waited for help. )

3. NOT HAVING MANY PHOTOS FROM MY CHILDHOOD

Some of my favorite memories as a child were baking chocolate chip cookies from scratch with my mama, hiking around the little log cabin we lived in (with a dozen cats in tow), and going out in the woods to cut and drag our Christmas tree home.

The thing is: I don’t have pictures of these memories.

There are recurring stories, traditions and details in our lives that become SO much sweeter if we have photos of them.  Photographs allow our memories to stay alive and breathing.

From your childhood, to falling in love, to parenthood and the family that you grow into together. I have a feeling you’re already thinking of some meaningful family stories but have never thought to have them recorded.

You know what those stories are for yourself, and I can help. It’s time to photograph those stories only exist in your head.

 

I HELP DOCUMENT THE MEANINGFUL STORIES IN YOUR LIFE, SO THAT YOU CAN SLOW DOWN, BE FULLY PRESENT AND HAVE A HOME FILLED WITH MEMORIES YOU CAN RELIVE OVER AND OVER.

 

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